An older Maori man wearing a business suit with a purple tie has his long hair up and has traditional facial tattoos covering from his temples down.

An older Maori man wearing a business suit with a purple tie has his long hair up and has traditional facial tattoos covering from his temples down.

Beautiful Maori Huni With Traditional Maori Ta Moko - For the Meanest Unique High Quality Aotearoa New Zealand Maori Kiwi Pasifika Polynesian Tribal HipHop Street Wear Peep us at: WWW.POLYTZ.COM *Registered Postage Worldwide Inc   *Please Follow and Like Us on FACEBOOK HERE: https://www.facebook.com/POLYTZURBANSTREETWEAR

Beautiful Maori Huni With Traditional Maori Ta Moko - For the Meanest Unique High Quality Aotearoa New Zealand Maori Kiwi Pasifika Polynesian Tribal HipHop Street Wear Peep us at: WWW.POLYTZ.COM *Registered Postage Worldwide Inc *Please Follow and Like Us on FACEBOOK HERE: https://www.facebook.com/POLYTZURBANSTREETWEAR

Illustration from one of the Captain Cook Voyages.  Sydney Parkinson, 'Portrait of a New Zealand Man' 1769, pen and wash on paper

Illustration from one of the Captain Cook Voyages. Sydney Parkinson, 'Portrait of a New Zealand Man' 1769, pen and wash on paper

Most modern moko are done with modern electric tatoo needles, but in pre European times, they where done with a chisel type instrument that left scaring as well as imbedded ink, so the result was a 3D skin decoration. The following are well known New Zealand paintings by a bloke called Goldie. He's done dozens of these paintings in the 19th century, in order to record the art of ta moko before the missionaries stamped it out altogether.

Most modern moko are done with modern electric tatoo needles, but in pre European times, they where done with a chisel type instrument that left scaring as well as imbedded ink, so the result was a 3D skin decoration. The following are well known New Zealand paintings by a bloke called Goldie. He's done dozens of these paintings in the 19th century, in order to record the art of ta moko before the missionaries stamped it out altogether.


Mais ideias
This photograph of an unidentified Maori man with a moko (facial tattoo) was taken in 1880.     Some Christian missionaries disapproved of moko, arguing that they were a heathen practice, so some Maori men let their facial hair grow to cover their tattoos.     Friggin missionaries.

This photograph of an unidentified Maori man with a moko (facial tattoo) was taken in 1880. Some Christian missionaries disapproved of moko, arguing that they were a heathen practice, so some Maori men let their facial hair grow to cover their tattoos. Friggin missionaries.

Charles Frederick Goldie, OBE (1870–1947) was a well-known New Zealand artist, famous for his portrayal of Māori dignitaries.

Charles Frederick Goldie, OBE (1870–1947) was a well-known New Zealand artist, famous for his portrayal of Māori dignitaries.

Māori Tā Moko face marking was a sacred practice among the indigenous tribes of New Zealand. Each moko design was unique to each individual, (no two designs were ever the same as they were never duplicated) and signified a young man’s transition from childhood to manhood. As well as representing rank and status these marks also had significant meaning to the wearer, symbolically connecting them to their ancestors and lineage.

Māori Tā Moko face marking was a sacred practice among the indigenous tribes of New Zealand. Each moko design was unique to each individual, (no two designs were ever the same as they were never duplicated) and signified a young man’s transition from childhood to manhood. As well as representing rank and status these marks also had significant meaning to the wearer, symbolically connecting them to their ancestors and lineage.

New Zealand | A cropped image of the original painting of Tamati Waka Nene (c.1785-1871) by Gottfried Lindauer, in 1890. | Tamati Waka Nene was a warrior and chieftan of the Ngati-Hoa tribe in the early 19th century.

New Zealand | A cropped image of the original painting of Tamati Waka Nene (c.1785-1871) by Gottfried Lindauer, in 1890. | Tamati Waka Nene was a warrior and chieftan of the Ngati-Hoa tribe in the early 19th century.

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