Manga Methods Techniques and Tools

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a comic strip with some people talking to each other and one person sitting at a desk
From Bakuman by Tsugumi Oba and Takeshi Obata. This is a Manga series about drawing Manga. It follows two aspiring young creators and shows what the life of a real mangaka is like. The scene in this image is of a typical day in the office. Though Mangaka are generally responsible for creating every aspect of their work; that is, writing, penciling, inking and coloring, they often have assistants to take care of mundane tasks.
an image of two people with different expressions on their faces, one is looking at the other
From Hirohiko Araki's Jojo's Bizarre Adventure. The text at the bottom reads "GoGoGoGo", something Araki uses quite often. It is a technique called "Giongo" used in Manga to communicate atmosphere. "GoGoGo" is supposed to feel "menacing"
From Naoki Urasawa's Monster. Urasawa claims that he likes to use rain instead of showing too much emotion on a character's face. This may be compared with the use of abstract visual effects to create atmosphere in Manga. Though the characters within the story experience the rain, the rain is drawn for the reader to experience. Johan Liebert Manga Panel, Monster Naoki Urasawa, Monster Johan, Monster Manga, Johan Liebert, Tezuka Osamu, Naoki Urasawa, Monster Anime, Brazilian Portuguese
From Naoki Urasawa's Monster. Urasawa claims that he likes to use rain instead of showing too much emotion on a character's face. This may be compared with the use of abstract visual effects to create atmosphere in Manga. Though the characters within the story experience the rain, the rain is drawn for the reader to experience.
a drawing of a man's face is being drawn on a piece of paper
Original member of the Gekiga Workshop, Takao Saito drawing his character Golgo during his exclusive interview with Naoki Urasawa. Urasawa interviews legends of the industry, showing rare footage of them at work in the studio, revealing their techniques and talking about their philosophy and how they communicate through Manga. Saito is an old master who, instead of waiting for his ink to dry, dries his freshly inked drawings with a lit cigarette and continues working.
the instructions for how to make comics
Manga reading order from top publisher TOKYOPOP
the cover to astro boy vol 1, with an image of saturn in the background
This is Book one of Astro Boy by Osamu Tezuka. Astro Boy ended up being adapted into the world's first anime, which has become an international cultural phenomenon. Tezuka's Mushi Studio revolutionized animated television by reducing the number of frames per second, thus reducing the workload and allowing for more content to be put out. (Mushi, meaning Bug, is probably a play on the character in "Mu" from Tezuka's first name, which contains the radical for "bug".)
an image of a cartoon character with the words dragon ball written in chinese and english
This is the widely popular character Son Goku from Akira Toriyama's Dragonball. Dragonball is loosely based on the Chinese epic Journey to the West. Son Goku is the Japanese translation of Sun Wukong. Toriyama was a comedy writer, known for his hit series Dr. Slump. He originally created Dragonball as a parody of contemporary action Manga. It grew in popularity unexpectedly and ironically became the new standard for action Manga.
a man is holding pens in his hand and looking at the pen he has placed on top of
Tatsuyuki Maeda is a professional Manga assistant. This image is from an exclusive video of him explaining Manga tools. Assistants are very important for mainstream Mangaka. In the west, mainstream comics usually have the labor divided by writer, penciler, inker, letterer and colorist. Oftentimes these people don't even work in the same room. In Japan, there is generally one person responsible for all of this, but they will delegate specific tasks on each page to a team of assistants.
a woman sitting at a desk writing on a piece of paper with a pencil in her hand
Akiko Higashimura, perhaps the fastest Mangaka, drawing while being filmed over the course of several days for Naoki Urasawa's documentary series, Manben. Manben features legendary Mangaka, revealing their philosophies and incredible work ethic and talent.
the storyboard for action - to - action translations show a single subject progression through a specific movement
This image is from Scott McCloud's lesson on comic book panel transitions.
an image of a black and white comic strip
This is an image from Dragonball where Toriyama used Giongo, the Japanese onomatopoeia to convey mood. It reads "Gyuaa" Notice that Giongo become a part of the artwork as well. Giongo often reflect the nature of who or what they represent.
an abstract black and white drawing of a giant object in the middle of a city
From Katsuhiro Otomo's Akira. This Manga takes pale after a fictional WWIII but we may draw many parallels between this setting and WWII and Post WWII Japan. A bomb wiping out Tokyo and the construction of a facility to host the Olympics despite poverty and social unrest are particularly compelling similarities. This masterpiece beautifully illustrates how an understanding of Japanese culture and history can cause a greater appreciation of Manga.
the dragon ball character is in black and white
This is SUper Saiyajin Goku from Dragonball. This was thnballe birth of the "instantaneous character transformation" that is so ubiquitous in Shonen Manga today. Akira Toriyama's creative story, colorful characters and intense action scenes paved the way for an unprecedented era of action fighting Manga.
This is an image from a tutorial by Manga artist Chihiro Howe applying a screen tone traditionally to an image. Screen tones are adhesive on one side. Once applied to the surface of an inked drawing, the excess is removed meticulously with a blade. This is a very Zen-like and time-consuming practice.  Many modern artists have switched to applying screen tones digitally. White Ink, Chihiro Howe, Manga Screentones, Screen Tone, Modern Artists, Like A Pro
This is an image from a tutorial by Manga artist Chihiro Howe applying a screen tone traditionally to an image. Screen tones are adhesive on one side. Once applied to the surface of an inked drawing, the excess is removed meticulously with a blade. This is a very Zen-like and time-consuming practice. Many modern artists have switched to applying screen tones digitally.
an old japanese book with cartoon characters on the front and back cover, in english
From Astro Boy by Osamu Tezuka. Astro Boy was the precedent for countless Shonen Manga. The Manga ran in the Weekly Shonen Magazin after WII during the Reconstruction era in Japan. This was a pivotal time for the country and Astro Boy served to give the people hope by representing the undying, pure spirit of the Japanese. Shonen (meaning young boy) characters like Goku Naruto and Monkey D. Luffy often exhibit relentlessly positive attitudes because of this.