St. Simeon church, Aleppo, Syria. 475 AD

When searching for a place mentioned in a radio program, found this nice place - Church of Saint Simeon Stylites, near Aleppo, Syria

The Church of St. Polyeuctus (Greek: Ἅγιος Πολύευκτος, Hagios Polyeuktos) was an ancient Byzantine church in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) built by the noblewoman Anicia Juliana and dedicated to Saint Polyeuctus. Intended as an assertion of Juliana's own imperial lineage, After being built over in the Ottoman period, the site of the church was rediscovered during excavations in the 1960s

Remains with peacock detail from St Polyeuktos Church, century, Constantinople, commissioned by Anicia Juliana

After writing years ago about long-lost St Polyeuktos in #Istanbul (6th c. #church funded by a wealthy, powerful woman, which supposedly spawned the competitive building of the #HagiaSophia) - I finally got to see the exquisite sculptural remnants at Istanbul's #Archaeology #Museum. #byzantium #constantinople

After writing years ago about long-lost St Polyeuktos in c. funded by a wealthy, powerful woman, which supposedly spawned the competitive building of the - I finally got to see the exquisite sculptural remnants at Istanbul's

Detail - The remains of the 6th Century Church of St. Polyeuktos, Constantinople

Detail - The remains of the Century Church of St.

Spolia, Santorini, Greece 2009

Columnist Aaron Betsky sets the record straight on what makes for good architecture.

Pilastri Acritani in front of the South portal of San Marco basilica in Venice : they are spolia from the St Polyeuktos church in Constantinople (6th c.)

Pilastri Acritani in front of the South portal of San Marco basilica in Venice : they are spolia from the St Polyeuktos church in Constantinople c.

A Column Capitel of Anicia Juliana's Palace - Church in Istanbul. 524 - 527

A Column Capitel of Anicia Juliana's Palace - Church in Istanbul.

One of the primary finds that helped to identify St. Polyeuktos was the inscriptions that were to be found around the fragmentary niches,the apse of which were filled with the outspread tail feathers of a peacock. The inscription was identified as the seventy-six line epigram recorded in a 10th century source,Palatine Anthology,which stated that it belonged to the church of the martyr Polyeuktos built by Anicia Juliana, the great-granddaughter of the empress Eudocia (wife of Theodosius II) "

One of the primary finds that helped to identify St. Polyeuktos was the inscriptions that were to be found around the fragmentary niches,the apse of which were filled with the outspread tail feathers of a peacock. The inscription was identified as the seventy-six line epigram recorded in a 10th century source,Palatine Anthology,which stated that it belonged to the church of the martyr Polyeuktos built by Anicia Juliana, the great-granddaughter of the empress Eudocia (wife of Theodosius II) "


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