Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana FotográficaMarc Ferrez. Negra da Bahia, c. 1885. Salvador, BA / Acervo IMS

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana FotográficaMarc Ferrez. Negra da Bahia, c. 1885. Salvador, BA / Acervo IMS

Marc Ferrez. Negra da Bahia, c. 1885. Salvador, BA.

Marc Ferrez. Negra da Bahia, c. 1885. Salvador, BA.

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

"Love, an emotion so strong that you would give up everything, to just feel it once, to know that you are part of something special. To know that you can feel what love really is, to know, to feel, to love."

"Love, an emotion so strong that you would give up everything, to just feel it once, to know that you are part of something special. To know that you can feel what love really is, to know, to feel, to love."

Brasiliana Fotográfica

Brasiliana Fotográfica

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

João Goston. Negra posando em estúdio, c. 1870. Salvador, BA.

João Goston. Negra posando em estúdio, c. 1870. Salvador, BA.

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

Dia da Abolição da Escravatura | Brasiliana Fotográfica

http://brasilianafotografica.bn.br/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/

http://brasilianafotografica.bn.br/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/

Escrava Anastácia, or Anastácia the slave, was an 18th century Brazilian slave. She suffered a brutal existence because she refused to give in to the sexual desires of her master. Much of her life is the subject of folklore and is sometimes depicted with blue eyes. A woman of great beauty, she was muzzled with a mask and often suffered in silence. Today, throughout Brazil, many women wear the mask in public displays in honor of Anastácia as a sysmbol of resistance.

Escrava Anastácia, or Anastácia the slave, was an 18th century Brazilian slave. She suffered a brutal existence because she refused to give in to the sexual desires of her master. Much of her life is the subject of folklore and is sometimes depicted with blue eyes. A woman of great beauty, she was muzzled with a mask and often suffered in silence. Today, throughout Brazil, many women wear the mask in public displays in honor of Anastácia as a sysmbol of resistance.

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