Elizabeth Cady Stanton ~ "Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement. Her 'Declaration of Sentiments,' presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States."

Elizabeth Cady Stanton ~ "Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement. Her 'Declaration of Sentiments,' presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States."

Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote By Tanya Lee Stone (America)

21 Picture Book Biographies

Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote By Tanya Lee Stone (America)

"The history of the past is but one long struggle upward to equality." — Elizabeth Cady Stanton

23 Quotes That’ll Light A Fire Under Your Ass

"The history of the past is but one long struggle upward to equality." — Elizabeth Cady Stanton

In November 1920, over eight million women voted for the first time after the 19th Amendment was passed, as a result of efforts led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. (photo: Library of Congress)

In November 1920, over eight million women voted for the first time after the 19th Amendment was passed, as a result of efforts led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. (photo: Library of Congress)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women’s History Month: 5 Suffragettes Who Wouldn’t Quit | Levo League | #womensrights #womenshistorymonth #whm

Women’s History Month: 5 Suffragettes Who Wouldn’t Quit

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women’s History Month: 5 Suffragettes Who Wouldn’t Quit | Levo League | #womensrights #womenshistorymonth #whm

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.  These two women fought, till the day they died, for women's suffrage.  Unfortunately, neither of them lived to see the day where a women could legally cast her vote, but with out them, who knows when we would have been granted this right.

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. These two women fought, till the day they died, for women's suffrage. Unfortunately, neither of them lived to see the day where a women could legally cast her vote, but with out them, who knows when we would have been granted this right.

A small group of thoughtful, committed citizens - William Lloyd Garrison, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Rachel Carson, Helen Keller, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Harvey Milk, Anne Frank, Miep Gies, Margaret Mead herself.

A small group of thoughtful, committed citizens - William Lloyd Garrison, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Rachel Carson, Helen Keller, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Harvey Milk, Anne Frank, Miep Gies, Margaret Mead herself.

Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia B. Mott, the Blackwell sisters, Julia Ward Howe, Lucy Stone, Mary A. Livermore, Martha C.Wright

Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia B. Mott, the Blackwell sisters, Julia Ward Howe, Lucy Stone, Mary A. Livermore, Martha C.Wright

In 1866, Elizabeth Cady Stanton became the first woman to run for Congress. Though women could not vote, there was nothing to prevent them from running for office. She paved the way for Jeannette Rankin, who 50 years later became the first woman to win a seat in the House of Representatives.

In 1866, Elizabeth Cady Stanton became the first woman to run for Congress. Though women could not vote, there was nothing to prevent them from running for office. She paved the way for Jeannette Rankin, who 50 years later became the first woman to win a seat in the House of Representatives.

Pinterest
Pesquisar