New Infographic on the Freedmen's Bureau Project

From 1865 to the Freedmen’s Bureau helped tens of thousands of freed slaves build new lives, while documenting nearly every aspect of the post-Civil War experience. As a result, the Freedmen’s Bureau records are among the most valuable sources of in

The Freedmen's Bureau, was a U.S. federal government agency that aided distressed freedmen (freed slaves) in 1865–1872, during the Reconstruction era of the United States.

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, usually referred to as simply the Freedmen's Bureau, was a U. federal government agency that aided distressed freedmen (freed slaves) in during the Reconstruction era of the United States.

Juneteenth: Discover Your Roots Using Freedmen’s Bureau Records — FamilySearch.org

Juneteenth: Discover Your Roots Using Freedmen’s Bureau Records — FamilySearch.org

The newly launched Freedmen’s Bureau Project aims to help current and future generations of African Americans connect with ancestors who were freed after the Civil War.

The newly launched Freedmen’s Bureau Project aims to help current and future generations of African Americans connect with ancestors who were freed after the Civil War.

Records relating to murders and outrages and reports of murders, outrages, and riots were submitted by subordinate and field officers in either tabular or narrative form. Although the term "outrage" meant any criminal offense, it usually referred to violent crimes by or against freedmen. The reports usually included the date of the incident and the county in which it took place; the names and race of the injured and accused parties; a brief description of the incident and the action taken…

The Freedmen's Bureau Online, Records of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands

The Freedmen’s Bureau Project is helping African Americans reconnect with their Civil War­-era ancestors. Join us in restoring thousands of records and linking millions of families. #DiscoverFreedmen

The Freedmen’s Bureau Indexing Project is helping African Americans reconnect with their Civil War­-era ancestors. Join us in restoring thousands of records, and begin building your own family tree.

UpFront with NGS: Freedmen’s Bureau Records -- Volunteer indexing effort of 4 million freed slave records underway

UpFront with NGS: Freedmen’s Bureau Records -- Volunteer indexing effort of 4 million freed slave records underway

Freedmen's Bureau

Freedmen's Bureau

A national effort launched Friday will connect African Americans with their Civil War-era ancestors through the release of million Freedmen's Bureau digitized images containing 4 million names.

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands is often simply referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau. Often as genealogists, we are aware of the Freedmen's Bureau, but do not fully realize the potential it holds for our genealogy research. Let's take a closer look.

Using Freedmen's Bureau Records Records in Genealogy Research

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands is often simply referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau. Often as genealogists, we are aware of the Freedmen's Bureau, but do not fully realize the potential it holds for our genealogy research. Let's tak

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands is often simply referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau. Often as genealogists, we are aware of the Freedmen's Bureau, but do not fully realize the potential it holds for our genealogy research. Let's take a closer look.

Using Freedmen's Bureau Records Records in Genealogy Research

Using Freedmen’s Bureau Records Records in Genealogy Research

Amazing Why Freedmen's Bureau Records Are Invaluable For Genealogist & Social Historians

The freedman's Bureau was a U. federal government agency established in 1865 to aid freedmen in the South during the Reconstruction era of the United States, which attempted to change society in the former Confederacy.

Smithsonian, the National Archives, the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints — will make available online 1.5 million historical documents, finally allowing descendants of former African-American slaves to learn more about their family roots.

Million Slavery Era Documents Will Be Digitized, Helping African Americans to Learn About Their Lost Ancestors in History June 2015 40 Comments

Freedmen’s Bureau Project - Ration Application

In celebration of Juneteenth, discover your African American roots by joining us in restoring thousands of records as part of the Freedmen’s Bureau Project.

Pinterest
Search