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25 years of ocean debris collected -- cigarette butts top the list!

In Honor of World Oceans Day: Infographics that Explore the Deep Blue Sea

plastic pollution in the ocean- do not punish the innocent animals because you are irresponsible, clean up your own mess safely and properly!

Great ocean debris infographic showing why it's so important to pick up litter wherever you go.

The Ugly Journey Of Our Trash

Earth: ~ Infographic: The Ugly Journey of Our Trash details the unbelievable scale of marine garbage, which is turning our oceans into "plastic soup." Reduce, reuse, and recycle!

Impacts of Marine Debris: the Struggle for Marine Animals | NOAA's Marine Debris Blog

Impacts of Marine Debris: the Struggle for Marine Animals

Impacts of Marine Debris: the Struggle for Marine Animals | NOAA's Marine Debris Blog

Plastic Garbage Project_Decomposition_How long until it's gone

This is an estimated decomposition rates of a common marine debris items. A reminder for us to recycle our waste everyday.

Marine debris on the Hawaiian coast - links to Wikipedia article about marine debris - we so need to clean up our act

Several years ago I got a wake-up call watching an Earth Day show on Oprah. I was surprised to discover there is a large floating island of garbage, twice the size of Texas somewhere between the West Coast and Japan. This moving ocean garbage patch.

The Marine Debris Tracker mobile application allows you to help make a difference by checking in when you find trash on our coastlines and waterways.

Great FREE smartphone app to document litter by GPS and type. App was developed in conjunction with NOAA.

Did You know? Ten percent of the plastic manufactured worldwide ends up in the ocean... often times sea turtles and other marine life mistake plastic debris as a delicious jellyfish causing death to more than 100000 of them. PLEASE if you take plastic bags to the beach remember to take them back and you will prevent a needless death. #LittleActsMakeABigDifference #MakeADifference #PlasticPollution #Cleanup #PlanetCleandAndSafe #Environment  #Conservation #Preservation #Protect #Safety…

Did You know? Ten percent of the plastic manufactured worldwide ends up in the ocean. often times sea turtles and other marine life mistake plastic debris as a delicious jellyfish causing death to more than 100000 of them.

"Poly Fish". My marine debris sculpture from attending the NACC Big Beach Clean Up and then the Marine Debris Art workshop.

"Poly Fish". My marine debris sculpture from attending the NACC Big Beach Clean Up and then the Marine Debris Art workshop.

http://thehappinessprojectlondon.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/151.jpg

Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2010

Turtle in trouble - Jordi Chias - Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2010 : One Earth Award - Winner

Homer Middle School students are using marine debris to create a sculpture of their school’s mascot.-Sarah Richardson

Homer Middle School students are using marine debris to create a sculpture of their school’s mascot.-Sarah Richardson

For Earth Day, the Kodiak High School Students created a massive Octopus work of art all created from marine debris.  Image Credit unknown. via Pinterest

For Earth Day, the Kodiak High School Students created a massive Octopus work of art all created from marine debris. the same debris is in on our beaches in

One of a series of weavings by Australian artist Aly de Groot using marine debris that would otherwise be polluting the seas and endangering marine life.

Aly de Groot ~ Let nature guide you, create functional art from leftovers ;

NOAA Recycling Infographic

Bring your plastic back to life – Recycle

By: Leah Henry One easy way to prevent marine debris from entering the environment is by recycling. Most people intend to recycle but the connection from a water bottle or single use plastic bag

Art made from trash and materials washed ashore in the SF Bay Area--bringing awareness of marine debris and plastic pollution: www.washedashore.org/ #earth #day Pin by Ken Carino. Reminds us to reduce, reuse, and recycle. AFS

Art made from trash and materials washed ashore in the SF Bay Area--bringing awareness of marine debris and plastic pollution: reduce, reuse, and recycle.