“Rosie the Riveter” Poster, 1943 | 12 Powerful Images Of Women In The Labor Movement

12 Powerful Images Of Women In The Labor Movement

Howard Miller’s World War II famous “We Can Do It” propaganda poster (commonly known as the “Rosie the Riveter” poster) is an example of a design whose meaning has become misconstrued over time, as reported by FIDM Graphic Design Student, Sara Berkes.

"There is plenty of room for mediocre men, but no room for mediocre women. Women just need to work harder..." Madeleine Albright

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We Can Do It!" is an American wartime propaganda poster produced by J. Howard Miller in 1943 for Westinghouse Electric as an inspirational image to boost worker morale. Fantastic combination of female strength and beauty!

"We Can Do It" poster by J. Howard Miller (1942).  NOTE: It was a year later, 1943, when Normal Rockwell painted his famous "Rosie the Riveter."

We Can Do It! (Rosie the Riveter)

Rosie the Riveter is on my list for my next tatt. "We Can Do It" poster by J. Howard Miller NOTE: It was a year later, when Normal Rockwell painted his famous "Rosie the Riveter.

An American icon telling women they are strong and not to forget it

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Rosie the Riveter, a U.S. cultural icon representing the American women who worked in factories during WWII

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"Rosie the Riveter" was the nation's poster girl for patriotism during World War II. The real Rosie, Rose Will Monroe, worked at the Willow Run plant in Michigan.

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Norman Rockwell... the original... "Rosie the Riveter" (1943)

Rosie the Riveter by Norman Rockwell, (An American woman employed in the production of military hardware during WWII. My mother was a Rosie Riveter and worked at the Rock Island Arsenal producing munitions.) Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.

Rosie the Riveter (J. Howard Miller's "We Can Do It!") L'icona della donna operaia ai tempi della seconda guerra mondiale, quando nelle fabbriche, mancando la manodopera maschile, si dovette incentivare il lavoro delle donne.

The woman who inspired “Rosie the Riveter” has died at 92

Rosie the Riveter is a fictional character created by Norman Rockwell in 1943 to boost women's confidence. It says that women can head America while the men are fighting in the Second World War

Female trainees at Middletown, PA, 1944. The Middletown Air Service Command stockpiled parts and overhauled military airplanes. During WWII, Middletown’s workforce grew from 500 to more than 18,000, nearly half of them women.

Female trainees at Middletown, PA, The Middletown Air Service Command stockpiled parts and overhauled military airplanes. During WWII, Middletown’s workforce grew from 500 to more than nearly half of them women.

Pôsteres para baixar de graça e dar cara nova às paredes da sua casa

Pôsteres para baixar de graça e dar cara nova às paredes da sua casa

Rosie the Riveter
  1942-  
FACTORY WORKER    She symbolized women's contribution to the war effort. Real-life Rosies filled factory positions while men were away (the number of American working women grew by 50 percent in four years), proving that we could excel at a "man's job."

We Can Do It! (Rosie the Riveter)

We Can Do It!: "We Can Do It!" This poster featuring the iconic "Rosie the Riveter" is (Photo Credit: Corbis) WWII

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