To mark the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that paved the way to universal suffrage, politicians, activists and writers share the books that changed their lives

The best political books by women: chosen by Gloria Steinem, Mary Beard, Diane Abbott and more

To mark the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that paved the way to universal suffrage, politicians, activists and writers share the books that changed their lives

Very interesting...What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

Very interesting...What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

In 1918, David Lloyd George's post-war government passed the Representation of the People Act, and for the first time women were included in the political process. Women now accounted for nearly 50 per cent of the electorate, but universal suffrage was a long way off, and women still had to face censure and discrimination in their professional and personal lives.

In 1918, David Lloyd George's post-war government passed the Representation of the People Act, and for the first time women were included in the political process. Women now accounted for nearly 50 per cent of the electorate, but universal suffrage was a long way off, and women still had to face censure and discrimination in their professional and personal lives.

Earl Grey in an etching dated 1789 by James Sayers.  Charles Grey, the British Prime Minister who oversaw the introduction of the 1832 Reform Act (leading eventually to universal suffrage for all adults, genuine constituencies, and secret ballots), is best remembered for the tea which carries his name.

Charles Grey in blue coat, white waistcoat and tied cravat, and powdered hair, by Henry Bone (after Thomas Lawrence), August He had a illegitimate daughter with Georgina Duchess of Devonshire

Kate Sheppard (10 March 1847 – 13 July 1934) was the most prominent member of New Zealand's women's suffrage movement, and is the country's most famous suffragette. Because New Zealand was the first country to introduce universal suffrage, Sheppard's work had a considerable impact on women's suffrage movements in other countries.

Kate Sheppard, the most prominent member of New Zealand's women's suffrage movement. New Zealand was the first country to introduce universal suffrage so Sheppard's work had a considerable impact on women's suffrage movements in other countries

"At Last", cover on 'The Suffragist', Saturday, June 21, 1919. In September 1918 President Wilson endorsed the amendment granting women the right to vote. It took nine months from Wilson's endorsement until Congress passed the amendment in June 1919.

Reform Movements "At Last", cover on 'The Suffragist', Saturday, June In September 1918 President Wilson endorsed the amendment granting women the right to vote. It took nine months from Wilson's endorsement until Congress passed the amendment in June

Map of what election would have looked like before 15th Amendment, when only white males could vote.

What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

Emily Wilding Davison, who threw herself under a horse owned by King George V at the Epsom Derby in 1913.Universal suffrage was finally introduced in 1928.

Famous British protests

Emily Wilding Davison at the Derby Few individuals have made a more powerful protest than suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who threw herself under a horse owned by King George V at the Epsom Derby in

Everybody's Favorite by Becky Brown

Grandmothers Choice: Votes For Women Block Everybodys Favorite: Universal Suffrage

Universal Suffrage, 10th December 1848, election of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte 1808-73, 1848-49 by Frederic Sorrieu

Universal Suffrage, December election of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte 1808 1848 49 - Frederic Sorrieu

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