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John waterhouse

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for John waterhouse. Get inspired and try out new things.
Circe_the_Witch_by_LostonWallace

Escama de dragón, diente de lobo, Humores de momia, fauces y entrañas De voraz tiburón de agua salada, Raíz de cicuta arrancada en la noche, Hígado de blasfemo judío, Hiel de macho cabrío y esqueje…

https://flic.kr/p/Lroisy | John William Waterhouse "The Danaides" 1906 (modified) | John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) English Pre-Raphaelite painter.  Oil on canvas Aberdeen Art Gallery, UK: www.aagm.co.uk/thecollections/objects/object/The-Danaides?l  In Greek mythology, the Danaides  were the fifty daughters of King Danaus of Argos, who were all married on a single occasion to fifty suitors, the fifty sons of Danaus's twin brother Aegyptus, king of Egypt. At their father’s instructions al...

John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) English Pre-Raphaelite painter. Oil on canvas Aberdeen Art Gallery, UK: www.aagm.co.uk/thecollections/objects/object/The-Danaides?l In Greek mythology, the Danaides were the fifty daughters of King Danaus of Argos, who were all married on a single occasion to fifty suitors, the fifty sons of Danaus's twin brother Aegyptus, king of Egypt. At their father’s instructions all but one of them killed their husbands on their wedding night. The one remaining…

There is much to love, much to laugh at, and much to wonder at in Trinity Shakespeare's production of The Tempest, performed in repertory with A Comedy of Errors.

There is much to love, much to laugh at, and much to wonder at in Trinity Shakespeare's production of The Tempest, performed in repertory with A Comedy of Errors.

Forgotten Fairies of Irish Folklore. A Merrow woman. Mermaids of Scots/Irish folklore.

Irish fairy tales and folklore are populated with a wonderful collection of magical creatures and supernatural beings. Leprechauns are so famous they can sell breakfast cereal, and many people have heard the legend of the Banshee—but what about...

UNDINE - Also spelled Ondine. Undine is a mythological figure of European tradition, a water nymph who becomes human when she falls in love with a man but is doomed to die if he is unfaithful to her. Derived from the Greek figures known as Nereids, attendants of the sea god Poseidon, Undine was first mentioned in the writings of the Swiss author Paracelsus, who put forth his theory that there are spirits called "undines" who inhabit the element of water.

Presented for your viewing pleasure are beautiful Pre-Raphaelite fine art paintings. Included are works by Rossetti, Godward, Sophie Anderson, Edward Poynter, Lawrence Tadema, John Fitzgerald, Edward Burne-Jones, John William Waterhouse, John Stanhope, Evelyn de Morgan, and others.

Sophie on Twitter: "In Greek mythology, Circe was the daughter of gods Helios (the personification of the Sun) and Perse, a nymph. Born without usual goddess-like features, she taught herself witchcraft through herbs and poison and became a formidable sorceress #folklorethursday @FolkloreThurs

“In Greek mythology, Circe was the daughter of gods Helios (the personification of the Sun) and Perse, a nymph. Born without usual goddess-like features, she taught herself witchcraft through herbs and poison and became a formidable sorceress #folklorethursday @FolkloreThurs”

John William Waterhouse 1849-1917 fu un pittore Britannico di epoca vittoriana appartenente alle ultime manifestazioni dello stile dei preraffaelliti. È noto soprattutto per i suoi soggetti mitologici e per le protagoniste femminili dei suoi dipinti, incarnazioni di grazia o donne fatali.

Ti avevo cantato una canzone / Tu tacevi. La tua destra tendeva / con dita stanche una grande, / rossa, matura rosa purpurea. / E sopra di noi con estraneo fulgore / si alzò la mite notte d'estate, / aperta nel suo meraviglioso splendore, / la prima notte che noi godemmo...

Witches in History and Legend: Circe, the Mistress of Natural Magic and Metamorphosis | Owlcation

Learn more about Circe, the symbol of mythical witches, the ancient enchantress depicted in Homer's "The Odyssey," the mistress of natural magic and metamorphosis.