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This is Silvino's 16-year-old sister Orfa. Orfa wakes up at 5am every morning to take a bath. Then she goes to school. Back   by noon, Orfa cooks and takes care of the household. The fact that she has time to study despite her many chores is   astonishing, as it is difficult enough for orphaned children to stay in school at all.   "I want to be a nurse," she says. "It is hard, but I have to continue studying, and Silvino helps out."  Read more at…

This is Silvino's 16-year-old sister Orfa. Orfa wakes up at 5am every morning to take a bath. Then she goes to school. Back by noon, Orfa cooks and takes care of the household. The fact that she has time to study despite her many chores is astonishing, as it is difficult enough for orphaned children to stay in school at all. "I want to be a nurse," she says. "It is hard, but I have to continue studying, and Silvino helps out." Read more at…

Meet Loveness and her 3-month-old daughter Felicia. Loveness is one of many girls in Mozambique who got pregnant at an early age, and subsequently dropped out of school. Loveness did not see any other option than to drop out. Her parents and the baby's father kept insisting that she go back and study for her future, but she felt ashamed and did not believe she could be a good student when she had just become a mother.  Read her story at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11852.html

Meet Loveness and her 3-month-old daughter Felicia. Loveness is one of many girls in Mozambique who got pregnant at an early age, and subsequently dropped out of school. Loveness did not see any other option than to drop out. Her parents and the baby's father kept insisting that she go back and study for her future, but she felt ashamed and did not believe she could be a good student when she had just become a mother. Read her story at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11852.html

THE HEALTH CENTER IS MY HOME AND FAMILY  http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_12034.html    “Now I only work 24 hours a day,” jokes Dr. Fausto Muzila, the only doctor in the entire district of Changara . He has dedicated his entire life to working at the health center. “I don’t have my own family, I wouldn’t have time. Besides, the patients, the work I am doing here, it is all very rewarding. The health center is my home and family”.

THE HEALTH CENTER IS MY HOME AND FAMILY http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_12034.html “Now I only work 24 hours a day,” jokes Dr. Fausto Muzila, the only doctor in the entire district of Changara . He has dedicated his entire life to working at the health center. “I don’t have my own family, I wouldn’t have time. Besides, the patients, the work I am doing here, it is all very rewarding. The health center is my home and family”.

The Library of the Macunene School in Chibuto makes reading fun www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13055.html "Part of the books we have here thanks to UNICEF support are for children. We are very happy that our children finally can experience books that are not only schoolbooks, but that they can read for fun if they want to,” says Manuel Cuna, the librarian.

The Library of the Macunene School in Chibuto makes reading fun www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13055.html "Part of the books we have here thanks to UNICEF support are for children. We are very happy that our children finally can experience books that are not only schoolbooks, but that they can read for fun if they want to,” says Manuel Cuna, the librarian.

Camilo Ernesto Antonio, 16 years, is an example of where a strong passion for sports and great talent in athletics can take a young Mozambican: he was recently selected to represent his district, Mossurize, at the Provincial School Games. This is his story...http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13065.html

Camilo Ernesto Antonio, 16 years, is an example of where a strong passion for sports and great talent in athletics can take a young Mozambican: he was recently selected to represent his district, Mossurize, at the Provincial School Games. This is his story...http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13065.html

"When you’re growing up, you need all the food you can get"    Hot meals are served every day to children and the elderly at the Chiaquelane camp, a project run by Caritas and the National Institute for Social Action INAS, and supported by UNICEF. In this picture, children were included on the guest list for the first time, as a complement to the daily food distribution at the camp.     © UNICEF Mozambique/2013/Alexandre Marques

"When you’re growing up, you need all the food you can get" Hot meals are served every day to children and the elderly at the Chiaquelane camp, a project run by Caritas and the National Institute for Social Action INAS, and supported by UNICEF. In this picture, children were included on the guest list for the first time, as a complement to the daily food distribution at the camp. © UNICEF Mozambique/2013/Alexandre Marques

On Universal Children’s Day, UNICEF issued a new research paper highlighting global demographic shifts forecast for the coming generation of children that present major challenges to policy makers and planners.     The paper for instance says that by 2050 one in every three births will be African – as will also be almost one in every three children under the age of 18. One hundred years earlier, sub-Saharan Africa’s share of births was just one in 10.

On Universal Children’s Day, UNICEF issued a new research paper highlighting global demographic shifts forecast for the coming generation of children that present major challenges to policy makers and planners. The paper for instance says that by 2050 one in every three births will be African – as will also be almost one in every three children under the age of 18. One hundred years earlier, sub-Saharan Africa’s share of births was just one in 10.

Meet 14-year-old Silvino Masinge. Silvino's father got sick and died after working in the mines in South Africa, so life is   hard for Silvino and his family. His future would look bleak, if it weren't for one thing: school. "Studying is actually the   only way of getting a good job," Silvino explains.  Read more at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11835.html

Meet 14-year-old Silvino Masinge. Silvino's father got sick and died after working in the mines in South Africa, so life is hard for Silvino and his family. His future would look bleak, if it weren't for one thing: school. "Studying is actually the only way of getting a good job," Silvino explains. Read more at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11835.html

Afildo Rafael is a 19-year old student at the EPC Namarripe in Angoche. In 2006, he fell sick and hasn’t since been able to use his feet the way he used to. Some time ago, Afildo also started missing from school. It was Januario Nafai, the School Director of his school, who then went to visit his house and to convince him to come back to school.  Nowadays, Afildo is one of the best students in his class. He also actively participates in the Physical Education classes.

Afildo Rafael is a 19-year old student at the EPC Namarripe in Angoche. In 2006, he fell sick and hasn’t since been able to use his feet the way he used to. Some time ago, Afildo also started missing from school. It was Januario Nafai, the School Director of his school, who then went to visit his house and to convince him to come back to school. Nowadays, Afildo is one of the best students in his class. He also actively participates in the Physical Education classes.

Hortência Daniela is a lucky girl. She is a first grade student at the EPC Parta Primary School in Angoche, Nampula, and already participating in Physical education and sports classes.  “I like to play banana and entrada,” says Hotência mentioning some of her favourite traditional games, which she and her friends use to play during Physical Education classes.  Read more www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13063.html

Hortência Daniela is a lucky girl. She is a first grade student at the EPC Parta Primary School in Angoche, Nampula, and already participating in Physical education and sports classes. “I like to play banana and entrada,” says Hotência mentioning some of her favourite traditional games, which she and her friends use to play during Physical Education classes. Read more www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13063.html

“I believe all children deserve the chance to make something of their lives. I am committed to helping UNICEF provide a quality education to children to help them build a brighter future for themselves, their families, and their communities.” – Serena Williams, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.  Watch this video to hear more from Serena about the Schools for Africa initiative: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruh-v7sGWss

“I believe all children deserve the chance to make something of their lives. I am committed to helping UNICEF provide a quality education to children to help them build a brighter future for themselves, their families, and their communities.” – Serena Williams, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. Watch this video to hear more from Serena about the Schools for Africa initiative: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruh-v7sGWss

Fourteen-year-old Nenicha Viega and her family finally have a latrine for the first time in their lives.    All the family participated in building the latrine, which took three weeks to complete. The father dug the deep hole in the ground, his sons made the reed house for the latrine and Nenicha fetched water to make bricks.    Read more http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11303.html

Fourteen-year-old Nenicha Viega and her family finally have a latrine for the first time in their lives. All the family participated in building the latrine, which took three weeks to complete. The father dug the deep hole in the ground, his sons made the reed house for the latrine and Nenicha fetched water to make bricks. Read more http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11303.html

One of the “fundamental rights” of children is participation. Children have the right to take part in discussions on matters that affect them. They have the right to be heard and to have their views considered.  Read more at http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/9876_10686.html                                                      © UNICEF Mozambique/2012

One of the “fundamental rights” of children is participation. Children have the right to take part in discussions on matters that affect them. They have the right to be heard and to have their views considered. Read more at http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/9876_10686.html © UNICEF Mozambique/2012

‎"In school, I learn to read and write, to respect others and not to discriminate anyone. In school we learn to love ourselves and others. I love going to school to get an education." - Anissa (13)

‎"In school, I learn to read and write, to respect others and not to discriminate anyone. In school we learn to love ourselves and others. I love going to school to get an education." - Anissa (13)

In 2010 a gender audit of the education sector in Mozambique was conducted by UNICEF. And we found that more girls are enrolling in schools especially at primary level. The difference in enrolments between boys and girls has been reducing steadily. Girls in primary schools grew from 42.7 percent  in 2000 to 47.7 percent in 2011.   However, the key conclusion from the audit is that there is a still lot of ground to be covered to achieve gender equality in schools.

In 2010 a gender audit of the education sector in Mozambique was conducted by UNICEF. And we found that more girls are enrolling in schools especially at primary level. The difference in enrolments between boys and girls has been reducing steadily. Girls in primary schools grew from 42.7 percent in 2000 to 47.7 percent in 2011. However, the key conclusion from the audit is that there is a still lot of ground to be covered to achieve gender equality in schools.

In Mozambique, children now have a much better opportunity to learn than before. Today, 100 per cent of the children are enrolled in primary school, up from 69 per cent in 2003.    © UNICEF Mozambique/2012

In Mozambique, children now have a much better opportunity to learn than before. Today, 100 per cent of the children are enrolled in primary school, up from 69 per cent in 2003. © UNICEF Mozambique/2012