Explore Unicef, Moçambique e muito mais!

Explorar tópicos relacionados

This is Silvino's 16-year-old sister Orfa. Orfa wakes up at 5am every morning to take a bath. Then she goes to school. Back   by noon, Orfa cooks and takes care of the household. The fact that she has time to study despite her many chores is   astonishing, as it is difficult enough for orphaned children to stay in school at all.   "I want to be a nurse," she says. "It is hard, but I have to continue studying, and Silvino helps out."  Read more at…

This is Silvino's 16-year-old sister Orfa. Orfa wakes up at 5am every morning to take a bath. Then she goes to school. Back by noon, Orfa cooks and takes care of the household. The fact that she has time to study despite her many chores is astonishing, as it is difficult enough for orphaned children to stay in school at all. "I want to be a nurse," she says. "It is hard, but I have to continue studying, and Silvino helps out." Read more at…

“Initially, my parents had to take me out of school because they could not afford my schooling anymore. Like so many other girls here, I had two choices: either to get married or go to an Arab country to work as a maid.” Jemila Sheik Abdella, 17.    Happily, however, Jemila never left Ethiopia, nor did she leave her studies.

“Initially, my parents had to take me out of school because they could not afford my schooling anymore. Like so many other girls here, I had two choices: either to get married or go to an Arab country to work as a maid.” Jemila Sheik Abdella, 17. Happily, however, Jemila never left Ethiopia, nor did she leave her studies.

In 2010 a gender audit of the education sector in Mozambique was conducted by UNICEF. And we found that more girls are enrolling in schools especially at primary level. The difference in enrolments between boys and girls has been reducing steadily. Girls in primary schools grew from 42.7 percent  in 2000 to 47.7 percent in 2011.   However, the key conclusion from the audit is that there is a still lot of ground to be covered to achieve gender equality in schools.

In 2010 a gender audit of the education sector in Mozambique was conducted by UNICEF. And we found that more girls are enrolling in schools especially at primary level. The difference in enrolments between boys and girls has been reducing steadily. Girls in primary schools grew from 42.7 percent in 2000 to 47.7 percent in 2011. However, the key conclusion from the audit is that there is a still lot of ground to be covered to achieve gender equality in schools.

“I believe all children deserve the chance to make something of their lives. I am committed to helping UNICEF provide a quality education to children to help them build a brighter future for themselves, their families, and their communities.” – Serena Williams, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.  Watch this video to hear more from Serena about the Schools for Africa initiative: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruh-v7sGWss

“I believe all children deserve the chance to make something of their lives. I am committed to helping UNICEF provide a quality education to children to help them build a brighter future for themselves, their families, and their communities.” – Serena Williams, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. Watch this video to hear more from Serena about the Schools for Africa initiative: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruh-v7sGWss

UNICEF Mozambique is implementing the “Ignored Children project” since last year. In the Education the project aims to ensure that teachers in all Child-Friendly Schools districts have the knowledge and skills to provide inclusive learning environment for children with disabilities. The Physical Education and Sports is one of the components and includes: procurement of sports kits for children with disabilities and capacity development.

UNICEF Mozambique is implementing the “Ignored Children project” since last year. In the Education the project aims to ensure that teachers in all Child-Friendly Schools districts have the knowledge and skills to provide inclusive learning environment for children with disabilities. The Physical Education and Sports is one of the components and includes: procurement of sports kits for children with disabilities and capacity development.

Camilo Ernesto Antonio, 16 years, is an example of where a strong passion for sports and great talent in athletics can take a young Mozambican: he was recently selected to represent his district, Mossurize, at the Provincial School Games. This is his story...http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13065.html

Camilo Ernesto Antonio, 16 years, is an example of where a strong passion for sports and great talent in athletics can take a young Mozambican: he was recently selected to represent his district, Mossurize, at the Provincial School Games. This is his story...http://www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_13065.html

"Before, we used to come across children in Grade 3 who did not know how to read or write. Today, thanks to the Child-Friendly Schools initiative, even by Grade 2 our students do not face this challenge. In our teacher training we learned new methodologies and approaches, and that training helped us achieve a significant improvement in the level of our children's learning." says Nausone Moiane, Vice- Principal at the Ngungunhane School in Chibuto district.

"Before, we used to come across children in Grade 3 who did not know how to read or write. Today, thanks to the Child-Friendly Schools initiative, even by Grade 2 our students do not face this challenge. In our teacher training we learned new methodologies and approaches, and that training helped us achieve a significant improvement in the level of our children's learning." says Nausone Moiane, Vice- Principal at the Ngungunhane School in Chibuto district.

Recent data from the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Education Quality (SACMEQ) indicate that between 2000 and 2007 levels Mozambique registered a substantial deterioration in achievement in both reading and mathematics. (source: http://www.unicef.org.mz/cpd/chapters.php?chapter=cp4_35)

Recent data from the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Education Quality (SACMEQ) indicate that between 2000 and 2007 levels Mozambique registered a substantial deterioration in achievement in both reading and mathematics. (source: http://www.unicef.org.mz/cpd/chapters.php?chapter=cp4_35)

When anyone needs help or advice, they know they can always go to 14-year old Amina Gulamo Katamo. As the leader of the “Os Bradas” school club at Ngungunhane school in Chibuto, she is like an older sister to all the children, and she knows the answers to many important questions.

When anyone needs help or advice, they know they can always go to 14-year old Amina Gulamo Katamo. As the leader of the “Os Bradas” school club at Ngungunhane school in Chibuto, she is like an older sister to all the children, and she knows the answers to many important questions.

Meet Loveness and her 3-month-old daughter Felicia. Loveness is one of many girls in Mozambique who got pregnant at an early age, and subsequently dropped out of school. Loveness did not see any other option than to drop out. Her parents and the baby's father kept insisting that she go back and study for her future, but she felt ashamed and did not believe she could be a good student when she had just become a mother.  Read her story at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11852.html

Meet Loveness and her 3-month-old daughter Felicia. Loveness is one of many girls in Mozambique who got pregnant at an early age, and subsequently dropped out of school. Loveness did not see any other option than to drop out. Her parents and the baby's father kept insisting that she go back and study for her future, but she felt ashamed and did not believe she could be a good student when she had just become a mother. Read her story at www.unicef.org/mozambique/resources_11852.html

Pinterest
Pesquisar