Explore Colorized Photos, Civil War Photos, and more!

Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee & Traveller.  Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee & Traveller    Traveller was by far the most famous horse ridden during the Civil War.    Gen. Lee's saddle & horse tack is on display at the Museum of the Confederacy Richmond VA.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee & Traveller Traveller was by far the most famous horse ridden during the Civil War. Lee's saddle & horse tack is on display at the Museum of the Confederacy Richmond VA.

Atlanta, Georgia… Sherman’s Men Tearing Up Railroad Track.    Photographed in 1864 by Barnard, George N.    Sherman’s 62,000 men marched out of Atlanta “into the fat fields of Georgia like locusts devouring the land”, Sherman tore up every mile of railroad track and almost every station. Shermans Neckties

Atlanta, Georgia… Sherman’s Men Tearing Up Railroad Track. Photographed in 1864 by Barnard, George N. Sherman’s men marched out of Atlanta and tore up every mile of railroad track and almost every station.

Scene of Ewell's attack, May 19, 1864, near Spottsylvania [i.e. Spotsylvania] Court House. Dead Confederate soldier

ACW Photo: Dead Confederate soldier at the scene of Ewell's attack, May near Spottsylvania Court House

President Abraham Lincoln's casket laying in state at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio on April 29, 1865.

President Abraham Lincoln's casket laying in state at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio on April This is not the coffin (unless he'd been flattened). This is the catafalque on which the coffin sat.

American Civil War POW. c. 1865- It doesn't say whether this man is dead or alive! I can't see how he would be alive, so heartbreaking!

American Civil War Prisoner of War, Civil War Prison Union Confederate Prisoners of War, Prison Camp Prisons total died prisoner of war killed camps American Andersonville Douglas Morton Federal dead

Ulysses S. Grant and his son, Jesse Root, on the porch of their home in Galena, Ill.

Ulysses S. Grant and his son, Jesse Root, stand on the porch of their home in Galena, Ill. The house was presented to him in 1865 upon his return to Galena after the Civil War.

Abraham Lincoln Grave Site Vintage 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

Abraham Lincoln Grave Site Vintage 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

The coffins of Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln await reburial in the reconstructed Lincoln Monument in Springfield's Oak Ridge Cemetery in President Abraham Lincoln died in several hours after being shot at Ford's Theater in Washington.

Union Private John Jefferson Williams was killed May 13th 1865; he is thought to be last soldier killed in the Civil War.

The last soldier killed in the Civil War: Union Private John Jefferson Williams, May Company B of the Regiment Infantry.

This taken after Abraham Lincoln died in this bed after the assault at Ford's Theatre

Julius Ulke, an upstairs boarder at the Petersen house, had photographed Lincoln's deathbed a few minutes after the president's body was removed. Shortly thereafter, pandemonium broke loose.

This photo, from the collection of the Union Veterans of the Civil War, shows Alice Carey Risley, 89, the last surviving Civil War battlefield nurse, receiving a kiss from a veteran. 1936

Pennsylvania Civil War 150 FB page: This photo, from the collection of the Union Veterans of the Civil War, shows Alice Carey Risley, the last surviving Civil War battlefield nurse, receiving a kiss from a veteran.

The O'Connor House in Charleston, SC at the end of the Civil War. The realities of war sometimes get lost in the black-and-whiteness of these pictures.

Another view of the O'Connor House at 180 Broad Street in downtown Charleston, SC ~ This picture, along with all the other 1865 pictures on this board, was taken at the close of the Civil War in 1865

Fort Sumter, in Charleston, South Carolina, at the time of the American Civil War.

*FORT SUMTER ~ Charleston, S. Breach patched with gabions on the north wall of Fort Sumter, one of the 5 brick walls of Fort Sumter.

theoddmentemporium:  Bullet in a Bible  A soldier during the Civil War had his life saved by the Bible in his pocket.  He wrote to President Lincoln about it, and the President sent him a replacement with the Presidential signature.

theoddmentemporium: Bullet in a Bible A soldier during the Civil War had his life saved by the Bible in his pocket. He wrote to President Lincoln about it, and the President sent him a replacement with the Presidential signature.

Civil War Veterans Photo

This day serves as a recognition to those veterans' sacrifice and service to the US nation. We salute you great veterans! From O'Hare Precision Metals.

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