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INDIAN HEAD, Md. (March 10, 2009) Explosive ordnance disposal technicians are using remote-controlled machines to help detect and defuse improvised explosive devices. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jhi L. Scott/Released)

(March Explosive ordnance disposal technicians are using remote-controlled machines to help detect and defuse improvised explosive devices. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Class Jhi L.

FOB WARHORSE, Iraq (Sept. 10, 2008) Petty Officer 1st Class Jason Null, left, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Brian Sheffield, both assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EOD MU) 12, reload 5.56mm magazines during periodic weapons assessment at Forward Operating Base Warhorse. The assessment allows EOD team members the opportunity to ensure optimal weapon performance while maintaining combat readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mario A. Quiroga/

FOB WARHORSE, Iraq (Sept. 10, 2008) Petty Officer 1st Class Jason Null, left, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Brian Sheffield, both assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EOD MU) 12, reload 5.56mm magazines during periodic weapons assessment at Forward Operating Base Warhorse. The assessment allows EOD team members the opportunity to ensure optimal weapon performance while maintaining combat readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Mario A. Quiroga/

Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Ryan Gilfillan, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, takes measurements and looks for identifying markings on a German World War II-era 240mm shell that was pulled from a wreckage site off the coast of Liepaja, Latvia, as part of Baltic Partnership 2015.

Become an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician (EOD) in the US Navy. Defuse dangerous explosive devices and play a critical role in America’s Navy.

A Day in the Life of a US Army Bomb Disposal Expert

A Day in the Life of a US Army Bomb Disposal Expert

An U.S. Navy explosive ordnance disposal technician assigned to EOD Mobile Unit 11 prepares to clear an anti-tank mine from the road as part of an improvised explosive device training scenario during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, July 23, 2012.  Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jumar Balacy,

Navy explosive ordnance disposal technician assigned to EOD Mobile Unit 11 prepares to clear an anti-tank mine from the road.

Photo of Navy EOD Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott C. Dayton. (Photo from U.S. Navy)

Sailor's death in Syria shows just how ballsy Navy bomb technicians really are

The Department of Defense identified a sailor killed in action on Nov. 24 during Operation Inherent Resolve as Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott C.

Uniform Rank Badges for sale from Ian Kelly Militaria - https://www.kellybadges.co.uk/49-rank-badges

5131 Bomb Disposal Sqn Chief Technician Rank Slide Black On Sand Embroidered Air Force Rank Badge

5131 Bomb Disposal Sqn Chief Technician Rank Slide Black On Sand Air Force Rank Badge for sale

Navy EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Rifle

Navy EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Rifle

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (E.O.D.) - The Big Picture - YouTube

National Archives and Records Administration ARC Identifier 2569854 / Local Identifier Big Picture: Explosive Ordnance Disposal (E.

A robot used by Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit

A robot used by Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit

US Navy Explosive Ordinance Disposal

(February - A member of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Two repels out of a helicopter from the Fleet.

Robots continue to grow in their importance amongst law enforcement, military use, medical research and care, space exploration and entertainment, among other tasks. Robots recently in the news include Russia's decades-old Lunokhod rovers - recently photographed from Lunar orbit, the naming of "Curiosity", NASA's next Mars rover, and a robotic dental patient, designed for realistic training. Collected here are a handful of relatively recent photographs of robots around the w...

Robots, part III

Early bomb disposal involved the operator getting to the device and defusing it whilst being next to it. Robots, CCTV and small tracked vehicles have provided the opportunity to attend disposals from a safe distance.

Sicily (Jan. 27, 2003) -- Quartermaster 1st Class Brian Proctor examines an inert mortar round in an attempt to identify it during an exercise scenario resembling a terrorist attack on a military camp. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eight Detachment Four (EOD MOBDET 8, Det. 4) is undergoing their final evaluation problem, a week-long series of scenarios to certify their qualification for performing EOD procedures. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz.

Sicily (Jan. 27, 2003) -- Quartermaster 1st Class Brian Proctor examines an inert mortar round in an attempt to identify it during an exercise scenario resembling a terrorist attack on a military camp. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eight Detachment Four (EOD MOBDET 8, Det. 4) is undergoing their final evaluation problem, a week-long series of scenarios to certify their qualification for performing EOD procedures. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz.

A U.S. Navy explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) diver attaches an inert "Satchel Charge" to a training mine, during exercises in waters off Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Navy explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) diver attaches an inert "Satchel Charge" to a training mine, during exercises in waters off Naval Base Guantanamo Bay Cuba. (Had a former student who joined the Navy in this field. Much respect!

Airman 1st Class Nicholas Mazza,8th Civil Engineer Sqdn explosive ordnance disposal tech,& Staff Sgt.Christopher Dahmen,8th CES EOD technician,prepare their robot to investigate suspicious package at Kunsan Air Base,Republic of Korea,May 6,2014.EOD robot supports wing's mission by allowing Airmen to get close to suspicious objects without risking life.From N.Ireland so know bravery & daily stress of EOD technicians.(USAF Senior Airman Armando A.Schwier-Morales)

Airman 1st Class Nicholas Mazza,8th Civil Engineer Sqdn explosive ordnance disposal tech,& Staff Sgt.Christopher Dahmen,8th CES EOD technician,prepare their robot to investigate suspicious package at Kunsan Air Base,Republic of Korea,May 6,2014.EOD robot supports wing's mission by allowing Airmen to get close to suspicious objects without risking life.From N.Ireland so know bravery & daily stress of EOD technicians.(USAF Senior Airman Armando A.Schwier-Morales)

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