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Marvel, Posters

Marvel, Posters

Marvel, Posters

Marvel, Posters

Marvel, Posters

https://vimeo.com/92739186

https://vimeo.com/92739186

This image looks like it can't possibly be real, but it is. Taken back in 2006 when the Cassini spacecraft was orbiting the sixth planet, this photo captures a nighttime view of Saturn as light sparkles off of its rings.

Quite possibly the most beautiful photo of Saturn ever taken

Some of the greatest images from the Cassini spacecraft's mission to Saturn and its moons.

Arne jacobsen floor lamp by Louis Poulsen at Studio Schalling

Rare early floor lamp designed by Arne Jacobsen Produced by Louis Poulsen in Denmark Brass and lacquered metal Excellent vintage conditio.

earth from saturn by cassini spacecraft [1920x1080] via Classy Bro

Earth and its moon as seen through Saturn's rings by the Cassini spacecraft.

Cassini's Last Ring Portrait at Saturn    Image Credit:  NASA, JPL-Caltech, Space Science Institute, Mindaugas Macijauskas

Cassini's Last Ring Portrait at Saturn Image Credit: NASA , JPL-Caltech , Space Science Institute , Mindaugas Macijauskas Explana.

The change in seasons brought a huge storm that wrapped around Saturn’s northern hemisphere. Cassini detected lightning deep within the planet. storm-PIA12826.jpg

100 Images From Cassini’s Mission to Saturn

Via saturn.gov Catching Its Tail July 2011 The huge storm churning through the atmosphere in Saturn's northern hemisphere overtakes itself as it encircles the planet in this true-color view from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

TOYOTA 86 by Xiaojun , via Behance

TOYOTA 86 by Xiaojun , via Behance

Cassini’s wide-angle camera recorded 80 images in just over two hours on Sept. 13 for a final full mosaic of Saturn. This view includes 42 of those images taken in red, green and blue spectral filters to create a natural color mosaic. Six of Saturn’s moons — Enceladus, Epimetheus, Janus, Mimas, Pandora and Prometheus — make a faint appearance in this image. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

After more than 13 years at Saturn and with its fate sealed NASA's Cassini spacecraft bid farewell to the Saturnian system by firing the shutters of its wide-angle camera and capturing this last full mosaic of Saturn and its rings on September 13 2017

Cassini bids farewell to Saturn’s yin-and-yang moon, Iapetus. This image is from the last set of observations Cassini made of this world of striking contrasts. The spacecraft helped scientists better understand Iapetus, solving a centuries-old mystery of why it should be bright on one side and dark on the other. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

Farewell to Iapetus

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