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chinese lanterns by Althytrion

Gasterias are succulents plants native to South Africa and related to Aloe.

Does anyone know what these are called?  We had a gardening "incident" several years ago. I had them in my backyard.. And they were tragically lost in my husband's weeding frenzy.   It was a dark time. :)

Chinese lantern - Physalis alkekengi - So pretty but so invasive - its root is a rhizome and spreads all over - try growing it apart from other things and in a large tub maybe

This stunning climber, the abutilon or Chinese lantern, is ideal for covering walls and sheds, with its arching shoots bearing bright-green foliage and spectacular flowers that hang in the air like miniature hot-air balloons.

Gardening news: Festival of lights with Chinese lanterns

Physalis alkelengi - Chinese Lantern - My absolute favorite fall "flower".   The pinner says...Highly invasive, however.

Physalis Chinese Lantern - Physalis fruit is a good source of vitamin C, beta-carotene, iron, calcium and trace amounts of B vitamins.

Caring For Chinese Lanterns: Tips For Growing Chinese Lantern Plants - If you see a resemblance between Chinese lanterns (Physalis alkekengi) and tomatillos or husk tomatoes, it’s because these closely related plants are all members of the nightshade family. The spring flowers are pretty enough, but the real delight of a Chinese lantern plant is the large, red-orange, inflated seed pod from which the plant gets its common name.

Chinese Lantern Information: How To Care For A Chinese Lantern

The delight of a Chinese lantern plant is the large, red-orange, inflated seed pod from which the plant gets its common name. Get tips on caring for these plants with the info found in this article.

FAQ: Growing Chinese Lantern Plants (Physalis alkekengi), via Mother Earth Living. Apparently, they do well from seed.

FAQ: Growing Chinese Lantern Plants (Physalis alkekengi)

Physalis alkekengi Chinese lantern Japanese or winter Japanese: hōzuki), is a relative of P. peruviana (Cape gooseberry), easily identifiable by the larger, bright orange to red papery covering over its fruit, which resemble paper lanterns.

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