Explore Eric Lafforgue, Papua New Guinea, and more!

Details from the Shell adornment worn by a woman from the Trobriand island | Papua New Guinea. Shells have a great value in the papuan islands. There is still a big exchange system between the islands, made by traditional boats once a year. Shells can be used as traditional money in many places.

Adorned | Australia & Oceanic Region

shell jewel in Trobriand island - Papua New Guinea by Eric Lafforgue

Trobriand Island ~ Papua New Guinea | Contemporary Mwali armbands; seldom worn - they were usually suspended from a braided rope. Mwali would be better described as currency, used for bride price & wealth exchanges. Originally they were circulated in pairs until the early 1900’s.

Trobriand Island ~ Papua New Guinea Contemporary Mwali armband, early

An unusual shell necklace used in the kula trade ring of the Trobriand Islands. Composed of sponylus shell disks, clam shells and seed pods. Early to mid-20th century.

Oceanic Art - Kula trade shell necklace, Trobriand Islands, An unusual shell necklace used in the kula trade ring of the Trobriand Islands.

Dance Ornament, mid-20th century. Possibly Bena Bena. Papua New Guinea or Indonesia, New Guinea. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Muriel Kallis Newman, 2007 (2007.215.6). | For important occasions such as dances, rituals, and ceremonial  gift exchanges, the peoples of the New Guinea Highlands adorn themselves in diverse and often spectacular regalia. Through their elaborate personal ornamentation, many Highland peoples effectively become living works of art. #dance

Dance Ornament Papua New Guinea or Indonesia

Sharing old photos of people from Motu, Central Province, PNG with you all (previously posted during the Tep Tok documentary making). #melanesianmarks #revareva #beauty ▫️ Image 1: Two motu kekeni posing in a demonstration of how to mark revareva. Tattooed girls from Papua New Guinea, circa 1940/50

Sharing old photos of people from Motu, Central Province, PNG with you all (previously posted during the Tep Tok documentary making). ▫️ Image Two motu kekeni posing in a demonstration of how to mark revareva. Tattooed girls from Papua New Guinea, circa

p-lanet-e-arth: “ Papua New Guinea shells and teeth by Eric Lafforgue ”

Kula canoes in the Massim region have elaborately carved prow and stern ornaments. They are often identical, giving the canoe two "front" ends that allow the vessels to be rigged and sailed in either direction. Papua  New Guinea, Massim region, late 19th-early 20th century, wood and apint

Kula canoes in the Massim region have elaborately carved prow and stern ornaments. They are often identical, giving the canoe two "front" ends that allow the vessels to be rigged and sailed in either direction

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Akusan (woman's belt) from Bontoc, Philippines. Conus shells, coiled brass, woven cotton fabric, and human bone.

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