Explore Newspaper Photo, Dance Images, and more!

Arnold Genthe photographer

Arnold Genthe Arnold Genthe - - German - won international fame as a pictorialist who in his portraiture captured the unposed moment of personal expression.

Stored in a bank vault, Arnold Genthe's Chinatown photos survived the disaster. Many others were lost.

Rare photos of San Francisco's Chinatown, before the earthquake

Arnold Genthe, Two children, Chinatown, ca 1900.

Arnold Genthe, Two children, Chinatown, ca

...

Artist Rene Bouche, violinist Alexander Schneider, sculptors Alexander Calder & Constantino Nivola,wearing paper masks at party at Calder’s Roxbury home.

P.P. Arnold

Arnold: The First Lady of Immediate Records - Mason's Yard studio, London, Photo: Gered Mankowitz

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-flamboyant-feminism-cult-artist-florine-stettheimer

The Flamboyant Feminism of Cult Artist Florine Stettheimer - Florine Stettheimer in her Bryant Park garden, c. Florine Stettheimer papers, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University.

“The Curse of Quon Gwon,” the first Chinese-American movie and one of the first directed by a woman, Marion Wong.

“The Curse of Quon Gwon,” the first Chinese-American movie and one of the first directed by a woman, Marion Wong.

Photographs depict life across North Africa 125 years ago  | Daily Mail Online

Photographs depict life across North Africa 125 years ago

The images depict views of North Africa villages, landscapes and portraits of local people in traditional costume

Tomie Arai, 'Peach Boy', 2003, etching - The black and white etching of a Chinese boy staring blankly ahead and wearing an oversized cowboy suit, reminds Robert Lee, co-curator of “Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity,” of himself. Lee knows the complexities of assimilation: his parents emigrated to the U.S. from China, he’s named after Robert E. Lee, the Confederate Civil War general, and as a child, his folks dressed him like a cowboy, too.

The black and white etching of a Chinese boy staring blankly ahead and wearing an oversized cowboy suit, reminds Robert Lee, co-curator of “Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity,” of himself…

According to the Manchu law, Han Chinese men had to choose between keeping their hair and their head - they were not allowed to keep both).  Here we see a man having his queue braided according to the law.

According to the Manchu law, Han Chinese men were required to wear their hair in the queue style to show loyalty to the Emperor. Here we see a man having his queue braided according to the law.

Pinterest
Search