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Vintage feather death crown Long ago, the people of Appalachia began to notice a peculiar phenomenon: odd crownlike masses in the pillows of the seriously ill or recently deceased. These objects became known as Death Crowns (or less-commonly, angel crowns). Death Crowns are usually elaborate, interlocking designs that resemble a disc or crown. The quills always point inward, and though rare, are only found in the feather pillows of the seriously ill or recently deceased.

Death Crowns: Macabre Omens of Death Found in the Pillows of the Sick

Feather Death Crowns: Appalachian Omens of Death Found in feather pillows of the elderly.

Funeral Customs, Rituals, Feather Crowns | Life in the Garden

Death Crowns In Appalachian folklore Death Crowns are curious discs of interwoven feathers that were found in the pillows of the dying or deceased, that is, in times when feather pillows were more.

This odd & rare object is what is known as a Death Crown, from Arkansas. They are made up of matted feathers in the pillow of a person who was sick in bed before death.

Death Crown of Feathers Post Mortem Cabinet of Curiosities Memento Mori Postmortem Demon Curse or Angel Blessing

The bottle tree - Appalachian History

"The Bottle Tree," Dave Tabler. Ever drive through appalachia and notice bottles neck down through tree branches?

Appalachia Through My Eyes - A Big Fine House.......one of my favorite blogs!

"He lives in a big fine house up in that new development" is a sentence you might have heard in our county over the last years. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with living in a big fine house-sometimes.

War on Poverty: Portraits From an Appalachian Battleground, 1964 | LIFE.com

War on Poverty: Portraits From an Appalachian Battleground, 1964

Why we call it "the living room": In years passed, it was the habit to hold a deceased person's viewing and wake at home in the front parlor. During that time it was referred to as "the death room". The Ladies Home Journal in 1910 declared the "Death Room" as no more and henceforth the parlor would be known as the "Living Room".

It was the habit to hold the viewing and wake at home in the front parlor -- it was referred to as "the death room". The Ladies Home Journal in 1910 declared henceforth the parlor would be known as the "Living Room".

At home in Appalachia.... Follow link to interesting article

Appalachia: Dispelling the myth

These Appalachian women from the mountains of Kentucky knew the art of spinning and the art of friendship. Image from The Filson Historical Society Special Collections.

The Filson Historical Society is a privately-supported historical society dedicated to preserving the history of Kentucky and the Ohio Valley Region.

Ruthenian Woman | What America’s Immigrants 'looked like *when* they arrived' on Ellis Island: We hear so often that America is "a nation of immigrants" or a "cultural mixing pot" . Unique America's History is as a Nation of Immigrants.

What America’s immigrants looked like when they arrived on Ellis Island

Just in case you did not know, this thing exists, and it is insane...

The giant golf ball thing is in Hawaii for a good chunk of the year.

Black Eyed Kids are among the most feared entities of all time, they are described as kids aged from 9 to 16, with normal physique and behavior, but eyes are pitch-black without any distinguishable pupil, iris or schlera. They appear in either normal or a bit old-fashioned clothes, and are said to speak in a tone too mature for their age.

The earliest known encounter with Black Eyed Kids took place in 1996 and was described by Brian Bethel, a veteran journalist and columnist at Reporter-News.

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