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La gran sinagoga de la calle Michelsberg, inaugurada en 1869, Wiesbaden. Los judíos comenzaron a establecerse en la ciudad desde el siglo XVII, debido a sus negocios relacionados con las termas. Con el paso del tiempo la comunidad se fue desarrollando; en el siglo XIX la mayoría de los judíos adoptaron una versión reformada del judaísmo. En ésa época la colectividad se dividió y los ortodoxos establecieron su propia comunidad separada.

The Great Synagogue on Michelsberg Street, Wiesbaden, Germany. Jews began…

The Regensburg Synagogue. The Jewish community in Regensburg, Bavaria existed as far back as the 11th century. Almost half of Regensburg’s Jews left Germany before the outbreak of the war. The remaining Jews were deported to ghettos in Poland as well as the Theresienstadt ghetto; most of them were murdered in the Holocaust.

The Regensburg Synagogue. The Jewish community in Regensburg, Bavaria existed as far back as the century. Almost half of Regensburg’s Jews left Germany before the outbreak of the war. The remaining Jews were deported to ghettos in Poland as well as t

Milicijos Street in Siauliai, before the war. Jews first settled in Siauliai during the 17th century. By the beginning of the 20th century Jews constituted over half of the city's population. Before the Second World War, Siauliai was home to some 6,600 Jews.

Milicijos Street in Siauliai, before the war. Jews first settled in Siauliai during the century. By the beginning of the century Jews constituted over half of the city's population. Before the Second World War, Siauliai was home to some Jews.

The Neolog synagogue on the ‘Jewish Street’ in Bratislava (Pressburg). The synagogue was built in an oriental-Moorish style and was opened in 1895. It held several hundred seats. During the Holocaust the synagogue was desecrated, partially vandalized, and turned into a warehouse for religious books taken from the houses of the deported Jews of the city. In the 1980s the building was destroyed during construction of a bridge over the Danube River

The Neolog synagogue on the ‘Jewish Street’ in Bratislava (Pressburg). The synagogue was built in an oriental-Moorish style and was opened in 1895. It held several hundred seats. During the Holocaust the synagogue was desecrated, partially vandalized, and turned into a warehouse for religious books taken from the houses of the deported Jews of the city. In the 1980s the building was destroyed during construction of a bridge over the Danube River

The Nieśwież synagogue, pre-war. In June 1941, Nieśwież was occupied when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. By the end of the same year, the Germans had murdered most of the town’s Jews, and a ghetto was established. By July 1942, the remaining Jews had been murdered, and the community of Nieśwież ceased to exist.

The Nieśwież synagogue, pre-war. In June 1941, Nieśwież was occupied when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. By the end of the same year, the Germans had murdered most of the town’s Jews, and a ghetto was established. By July 1942, the remaining Jews had been murdered, and the community of Nieśwież ceased to exist.

Jewish refugees who were housed in a synagogue in Szydłowiec.

The German Occupation and the Establishment of the Ghetto

November 9-10, 1938: Kristallnacht, also known as The Night of Broken Glass. German soldiers and other citizens attacked Jewish homes, shops, synagogues, and other property throughout Germany and parts of Austria. The attacks were triggered by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath by a German-born Polish Jew. Photograph shows the burning of a synagogue in Baden-Baden.  Source: Jewish Virtual Library

November Kristallnacht, also known as The Night of Broken Glass. German soldiers and other citizens attacked Jewish homes, shops, synagogues, and other property throughout Germany and parts of Austria. The attacks were triggered by the assassi

A Berlin synagogue lies in ruins following the Nazi-instigated Kristallnacht, a pogrom against Jews in Germany and Austria, which occured on night of 9 - 10 November 1938.

A Berlin synagogue lies in ruins following the Nazi-instigated Kristallnacht, a pogrom against Jews in Germany and Austria, which occured on night of 9 - 10 November 1938.

View of the Gleiwitz synagogue before its destruction on Kristallnacht.

View of the Gleiwitz synagogue before its destruction on Kristallnacht.

Municipality building in Nieśwież. On 30 October 1941, 5000 Jews were gathered in the square in front of the building. Later that day, the Germans and their collaborators took some 4000 of those Jews and shot them into pits

Municipality building in Nieśwież. On 30 October 5000 Jews were gathered in the square in front of the building. Later that day, the Germans and their collaborators took some 4000 of those Jews and shot them into pits

A synagogue in Szydłowiec, 1913.  In 1939 the town of Szydłowiec in Poland had a Jewish community numbering some 7,000 members. Economically, they subsisted primarily on industry, craftsmanship and trade. Culturally, the Jewish community maintained a wide variety of educational, cultural and religious institutions

A synagogue in Szydłowiec, 1913. In 1939 the town of Szydłowiec in Poland had a Jewish community numbering some 7,000 members. Economically, they subsisted primarily on industry, craftsmanship and trade. Culturally, the Jewish community maintained a wide variety of educational, cultural and religious institutions

Grodno - wooden synagogue (March, 1926.).

Grodno - wooden synagogue (March, 1926.).

A synagogue in Liepāja, before WWII. A Jewish community was established in Liepāja in the early 1800s, and by the end of the century there were some 9,400 Jews living in the city, about one-seventh of the city's population. At the beginning of the 20th century, approximately one-quarter of the Jewish population of Liepāja emigrated from the city

A synagogue in Liepāja, before WWII. A Jewish community was established in Liepāja in the early 1800s, and by the end of the century there were some 9,400 Jews living in the city, about one-seventh of the city's population. At the beginning of the 20th century, approximately one-quarter of the Jewish population of Liepāja emigrated from the city

Photo Gallery | The History of the Jewish Community of Nieśwież | The Valley of the Communities

Façade of the Nieśwież synagogue in the 1920s. In June 1941, Nieśwież was occupied when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. By the end of the same year, the Germans had murdered most of the town’s Jews, and a ghetto was established. By July 1942, the remaining Jews had been murdered, and the community of Nieśwież ceased to exist.

Façade of the Nieśwież synagogue in the 1920s. In June 1941, Nieśwież was occupied when Germany invaded the Soviet Union.  By the end of the same year, the Germans had murdered most of the town’s Jews, and a ghetto was established.  By July 1942, the remaining Jews had been murdered, and the community of Nieśwież ceased to exist.
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