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A la sombra de una explosión (Iwo Jima, 1945)

This captures the violence and sheer destruction inherent in war perhaps more graphically than any other ever published. Marines take cover on an Iwo Jima hillside amid the burned-out remains of banyan jungle, as a Japanese bunker is obliterated in March

CAMINO AL SURIBASCHI,  Marines de la cuarta división se adentran en la playa en Iwo Jima. Un marine muerto yace a la derecha en primer plano. El monte Suribachi, al fondo, se convirtió en una colmena armada de tropas japonesas.

Fourth Division Marines move in from the beach on Iwo Jima, the Japanese Volcanic Island. A dead Marine lies at right in the foreground. Suribachi, in the background, was turned into a.

Marines torch a Japanese defensive in Iwo Jima’s Mount Suribachi by using flamethrowers,1945.

wo U. Marines direct flame throwers at Japanese defenses that block the way to Iwo Jima's Mount Suribachi on March On the left is Pvt. Richard Klatt, of North Fond Dulac, Wisconsin, and on the right is PFC Wilfred Voegeli.

Raid on Southern Air Field

Raid on Southern Air Field

USMC Iwo JIma

Feb 1945 Americans land on Iwo Jima. Iwo Jima was a barren Pacific island guarded by Japanese artillery, but to American military minds, it was prime real estate on which to build airfields to launch bombing raids against Japan, only 660 miles away.

U.S. Marines stay low to avoid the murderous, incoming Japanese fire as they crowd the black-sand beaches of Iwo Jima on February 19, 1945. Over 30,000 men from the 3rd, 4th and 5th Marine Divisions landed during the initial waves. Sadly many of those brave warriors would never leave the beach on that first day. www.devildoggraphix.com

Marines land on the black, volcanic beaches of Iwo Jima under heavy enemy fire,

Picture: US Marines in Iwo Jima. Feb-March 1945.

In shadow of captured Jap blockhouse on second airfield, Iwo Jima, Marines inch forward under heavy enemy fire.

A Marine flame throwing tank, also known as a "Ronson", scorches a Japanese strongpoint at Iwo Jima

A Marine flame throwing tank, also known as a "Ronson", scorches a Japanese strongpoint. The eight Shermans equipped with the Navy Mark 1 flame-thrower proved to be the most valuable weapons systems on Iwo Jima.

February 19, 1945, Marines, among other America forces, raided the beaches of Iwo Jima.  It would take five weeks of intense fighting and cost nearly 7,000 U.S. lives to defeat the well-entrenched, heavily-fortified enemy positions and secure the strategic island

February Marines, among other America forces, raided the beaches of Iwo Jima. It would take five weeks of intense fighting and cost nearly U. lives to defeat the well-entrenched, heavily-fortified enemy positions and secure the strategic island

US flamethrower Sherman tank demonstrates its weapon in a field on the border of Germany, Sept 3, 1944.

SC Flame throwing tank in Belgium, demonstrates how snipers can be routed from haystacks in battle with Germans, 3 september

JUNE 6, 1944: D-Day. In the invasion of France, 150,000 Allied troops landed on the beaches of Normandy.  9,000 troops were killed or wounded in the assault   image: Normandy Beach

WWII - The D-Day Landings, U. troops wade ashore from a Coast Guard landing craft at Omaha Beach during the Normandy D-Day landings near Vierville sur Mer, France, on June (REUTERS/US National Archives)

US Marines burrowing in the volcanic sand on the beach of Iwo Jima Japan 20 February 1945. Note LSM-264 and Mount Suribachi in background.

USMC Marines burrowing in the volcanic sand on the beach of Iwo Jima, Japan, 20 Feb 1945 note and Mount Suribachi in background

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