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Tent Rocks in New Mexico from Nomadic Pursuits - HDR travel photography blog by Jim Nix

Kasha Katuwe Tent Rocks, New Mexico, U. ~ the cone shaped tent rocks formations are the products of volcanic eruptions that occurred million years ago and left pumice, ash, and tuff deposits over 1000 feet deep.

Castles

*UTAH~Queens Garden pathway in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Palouse Falls State Park in Eastern Washington State

Palouse Falls State Park in Eastern Washington Franklin/Whitman Counties, - 180 foot drop

Crater Lake, Oregon - this National Park is one of the country’s crown jewels. No place else on earth combines a deep pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost 2,000 feet high; a picturesque island & a violent volcanic past. Unfortunately, one of the driest years in history has reduced water flow in streams and rivers across the Upper Klamath Basin, including Crater Lake and the surrounding region. 10 Place to see Before They're Gone.

Crater Lake, Oregon - this National Park is one of the country’s crown jewels.

Cimarron Canyon National State Park - New Mexico - USA - by Michael Scott

✯ Cimarron Canyon - Taos, New Mexico - beautiful location, especially when the aspens turn.

King of Wings rock formation in the Bisti Badlands of New Mexico - photo by Philippe Schuler

Look they erected a giant statue of the Cheeto Nazi! (King of Wings rock formation in the Bisti Badlands of New Mexico - photo by Philippe Schuler)

New Mexico’s Bisti Egg Garden - photo by Gr8sublime, via WebEcoist;  The Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness is a wilderness area located near Farmington, New Mexico.  The Bisti Egg Garden is an area of unusual rock formations containing a combination of different types of sedimentary rocks with varying hardness.

Hard Boiled Wonderland: New Mexico's Bisti Egg Garden

New Mexico’s Bisti Egg Garden - Farmington, New Mexico. The Bisti Egg Garden (Sedimentary Rocks)

This area in New Mexico owes its remarkable geology to layers of volcanic rock and ash deposited by pyroclastic flow from a volcanic explosion. Over time weathering and erosion of these layers has created canyons and tent rocks. The tent rocks themselves are cones of soft pumice and  tuff beneath harder caprocks, and vary in height from a few feet to 90 feet.

New Mexico -result of layers of volcanic rock & ash deposited by pyroclastic flow from a volcanic explosion. Over time, weathering & erosion created canyons & tent rocks.

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