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This bass viol is the only instrument known to have been made by Martin Voigt of Hamburg. Voigt may have been a pupil of Joachim Thielke, who was Hamburg’s greatest luthier around 1700. This instrument is as beautifully decorated as any made by Thielke. The neck is decorated with four Greek gods and goddesses — Apollo, Venus, Mercury and Diana — inlaid in mother of pearl. In Greek myth Mercury was supposed to have invented the lyre, and Apollo excelled at playing it. The lyre was…

This bass viol is the only instrument known to have been made by Martin Voigt of Hamburg. Voigt may have been a pupil of Joachim Thielke, who was Hamburg’s greatest luthier around 1700. This instrument is as beautifully decorated as any made by Thielke. The neck is decorated with four Greek gods and goddesses — Apollo, Venus, Mercury and Diana — inlaid in mother of pearl. In Greek myth Mercury was supposed to have invented the lyre, and Apollo excelled at playing it. The lyre was…

Violone en sol - Modèle Ernst Busch ( environ 1640) Table épicéa Eclisses, fond et manche érable ondé Ornementation : rosace en poirier et filets polychromes sur la table  Chevilles tournées en palissandre Diapason : 86 cm

Violone en sol - Modèle Ernst Busch ( environ 1640) Table épicéa Eclisses, fond et manche érable ondé Ornementation : rosace en poirier et filets polychromes sur la table Chevilles tournées en palissandre Diapason : 86 cm

Um contrabaixo no lixo

Um contrabaixo no lixo

English cittern, circa 1600. A stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance, descended from the Medieval citole, or citole. Its flat-back design was simpler and cheaper to construct than the lute. It was also easier to play, smaller, less delicate and more portable. Played by all classes, the cittern was a premier instrument of casual music making much as is the guitar today.

English cittern, circa 1600. A stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance, descended from the Medieval citole, or citole. Its flat-back design was simpler and cheaper to construct than the lute. It was also easier to play, smaller, less delicate and more portable. Played by all classes, the cittern was a premier instrument of casual music making much as is the guitar today.

Contrabaixo

Contrabaixo

Tenor viola by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1664 One of only three Cremonese instruments known to have survived in original condition

Tenor viola by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1664 One of only three Cremonese instruments known to have survived in original condition

Cittern, possibly by Petrus Rautta, England, 1579.

Cittern, possibly by Petrus Rautta, England, 1579.

Michihiro Matsuda Guitars Headless arched top acoustic electric guitar (2015)

Michihiro Matsuda Guitars Headless arched top acoustic electric guitar (2015)

Model: Rosette Hole in Boxwood | Soundboard: Fir | Half-board: Madagascar Rosewood | Back: Madagascar Rosewood | Sides: Madagascar Rosewood | Neck : Mahogany | Fretboard: Madagascar Rosewood | Inlays: Ivory Built-in | Year: 2003

Model: Rosette Hole in Boxwood | Soundboard: Fir | Half-board: Madagascar Rosewood | Back: Madagascar Rosewood | Sides: Madagascar Rosewood | Neck : Mahogany | Fretboard: Madagascar Rosewood | Inlays: Ivory Built-in | Year: 2003

1650 English Alto viol at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London - From the curators' comments: "Viols were bowed instruments of differing pitches ranging from treble through alto and tenor to bass, and often played in an ensemble or 'consort of viols'....Consorts of viols were very popular in England from the 1520s until about 1660, when they were gradually superseded by the violin, an instrument much preferred by King Charles II."

Alto viol

1650 English Alto viol at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London - From the curators' comments: "Viols were bowed instruments of differing pitches ranging from treble through alto and tenor to bass, and often played in an ensemble or 'consort of viols'....Consorts of viols were very popular in England from the 1520s until about 1660, when they were gradually superseded by the violin, an instrument much preferred by King Charles II."

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