Explore Mesoamerican, Antique Books, and more!

Explore related topics

Images from the Borgia Group Codex - Fejervary Mayer from John Pohl.

Codex Laud

Codex Laud

Centeotl: was the Aztec god of Maize. His name means “Maize cob Lord” or “the Dried Ear of the Maize God”, and he represents the Aztec version of a more ancient and pan-Mesoamerican deity. Centeotl was the son of Tlazolteotl, the goddess of fertility and childbirth, and husband of Xochiquetzal.

Centeotl: was the Aztec god of Maize. He represents the Aztec version of a more ancient and pan-Mesoamerican deity. Centeotl was the son of Tlazolteotl, the goddess of fertility and childbirth, and husband of Xochiquetzal.

Chalchiuhtlicue

The Codex Borbonicus consists of 32 leaves of amátl fig paper and is likely the oldest of the surviving Aztec manuscripts from Mexico. It was produced early in the century

Codex Laud is a religious manuscript of the so-called Borgia group, which is a key to the understanding of pre-Hispanic religion and calendrics.

Tezcatlipoca and Quetzalcoatl

Tezcatlipoca was the Aztec god of night and all material things. He carried a…

The 10 Most Important Aztec Gods and Goddesses: Quetzalcoatl

The 10 Most Important Aztec Gods and Goddesses

Codex Mendoza (1542) - An Aztec codex, detailing military conquests and daily routine, created about twenty years after the Spanish conquest of Mexico with the intent that it be seen by Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain. En route to its commissioner it was stolen by the French, and finally ended up in a library in England

Codex Mendoza - An Aztec codex, detailing military conquests and daily routine, created about twenty years after the Spanish conquest of Mexico with the intent that it be seen by Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.

Sección 2: Los europeos invaden el imperio azteca

For Tenochtitlan, relation of a graphic novel: Aztec Military Ranks: Codex Mendoza / La Cadena de.

The Madrid Codex at the Museo de America - one of just four examples of Mayan writing to have survived the Catholic conquest.

Sumerios y Olmecas el mismo origen.

Huitzilopochtli

Cómo fue la fundación de Tenochtitlán: conoce el mito y la historia

José Tudela de la Orde, Huītzilōpōchtli, patron of the Panquetzaliztli festival, Codex Tudela Mexico.

La Malinche (c. 1496 or c. 1505 – c. 1529), known also as Malinalli, Malintzin or Doña Marina, was a Nahua woman from the Mexican Gulf Coast, who played a role in the Spanish conquest of Mexico, acting as interpreter, advisor, lover, and intermediary for Hernán Cortés.

La Malinche (c. 1496 or c. 1505 – c. 1529), known also as Malinalli, Malintzin or Doña Marina, was a Nahua woman from the Mexican Gulf Coast, who played a role in the Spanish conquest of Mexico, acting as interpreter, advisor, lover, and intermediary for Hernán Cortés.

Pinterest
Search