Graph paper artwork. Eugene Andolsek, n.d., ink on graph paper.

Graph paper artwork. Eugene Andolsek, n.d., ink on graph paper.

In 1950, Eugene Andolsek started a ritual of nightly drawing sessions at the kitchen table in the home he shared with his mother. Using graph paper, he would begin each composition by applying black outlines—what Andolsek called the “designs”—with a straightedge and a compass and then fill them in with color. The artist described his process as methodical and orderly but also trancelike, in that the drawings just “came out” of him. He sometimes did not even remember putting stylus to paper.

In 1950, Eugene Andolsek started a ritual of nightly drawing sessions at the kitchen table in the home he shared with his mother. Using graph paper, he would begin each composition by applying black outlines—what Andolsek called the “designs”—with a straightedge and a compass and then fill them in with color. The artist described his process as methodical and orderly but also trancelike, in that the drawings just “came out” of him. He sometimes did not even remember putting stylus to paper.

"This lifelong hobby [of Eugene Andolsek] prefigured and paralleled his immersive creation of tightly ordered, colour-charged abstract drawings. His earliest drawings were women’s fashion design sketches that he made during his teens, until his father derided them as ‘sissified’ and destroyed several of them. His mother’s handiwork with a needle and thread was the only art-related activity permitted in their home."

"This lifelong hobby [of Eugene Andolsek] prefigured and paralleled his immersive creation of tightly ordered, colour-charged abstract drawings. His earliest drawings were women’s fashion design sketches that he made during his teens, until his father derided them as ‘sissified’ and destroyed several of them. His mother’s handiwork with a needle and thread was the only art-related activity permitted in their home."

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