Another caricature of Pitt from 1789 relating to the regency restrictions

Another caricature of Pitt from 1789 relating to the regency restrictions

A batch of peers, 1792. Depicts King George, Queen Charlotte and William Pitt in a bakery making new peers. Possibly as a response to the large number of peerages given out during George III's reign.

A batch of peers, 1792. Depicts King George, Queen Charlotte and William Pitt in a bakery making new peers. Possibly as a response to the large number of peerages given out during George III's reign.

"Argument against Feeling", published by E Jackson, c. 1785. Fox spanks Pitt with a birch rod while Pitt says, "This is a question of feeling not Argumnt". According to the British Museum, it is "Probably a satire on the successful opposition to Pitt by Fox in 1785 over the Scrutiny [...] and the Irish Propositions". Definitely one of the weirdest caricatures of Fox and Pitt I've seen :/

"Argument against Feeling", published by E Jackson, c. 1785. Fox spanks Pitt with a birch rod while Pitt says, "This is a question of feeling not Argumnt". According to the British Museum, it is "Probably a satire on the successful opposition to Pitt by Fox in 1785 over the Scrutiny [...] and the Irish Propositions". Definitely one of the weirdest caricatures of Fox and Pitt I've seen :/

'War! Glorious War! or, The True Briton giving Monsieur a good Drubbing' by William Dent, 1793. Pitt k-o's Fox. His seconds are Henry Dundas and (I think) Edmund Burke, while Fox is tended to by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and someone I don't recognise.

'War! Glorious War! or, The True Briton giving Monsieur a good Drubbing' by William Dent, 1793. Pitt k-o's Fox. His seconds are Henry Dundas and (I think) Edmund Burke, while Fox is tended to by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and someone I don't recognise.

Consequences of a successfull French invasion ;"We come to recover your long lost liberties" : scene, the House of Commons, Gillray. 1798

Consequences of a successfull French invasion ;"We come to recover your long lost liberties" : scene, the House of Commons, Gillray. 1798

"The Countryman's Dream of Coalescing Virtue and Vice" by William Dent, 1784. A print made during the early days of Pitt's ministry, when it seemed unlikely to survive. It refers to  the scheme of the country gentlemen (backbench MPs), meeting at the St. Alban's Tavern, for a 'union' between Pitt and Charles James Fox, the leader of the opposition. Pitt is the tiny figure held in the arms of the 'nurse' (actually Lord North) to the left of the maypole dancers.

"The Countryman's Dream of Coalescing Virtue and Vice" by William Dent, 1784. A print made during the early days of Pitt's ministry, when it seemed unlikely to survive. It refers to the scheme of the country gentlemen (backbench MPs), meeting at the St. Alban's Tavern, for a 'union' between Pitt and Charles James Fox, the leader of the opposition. Pitt is the tiny figure held in the arms of the 'nurse' (actually Lord North) to the left of the maypole dancers.

'A peep at the Parisot with Q in the corner!' Isaac Cruikshank, 1796. Fox, Pitt and Sheridan with the Duke of Queensberry who was thought of as a libertine for his rampant womanizing and wild lifestyle. Mademoiselle Parisot was a French ballet dancer whose provocative costumes and dances caused an uproar in London. (Pitt certainly seems to be enjoying the, er, spectacle!)

'A peep at the Parisot with Q in the corner!' Isaac Cruikshank, 1796. Fox, Pitt and Sheridan with the Duke of Queensberry who was thought of as a libertine for his rampant womanizing and wild lifestyle. Mademoiselle Parisot was a French ballet dancer whose provocative costumes and dances caused an uproar in London. (Pitt certainly seems to be enjoying the, er, spectacle!)

The Competitors,12 Dec 1788. Pitt and the Prince of Wales "compete" for the crown - a satire on the debate of 10 Dec, when Burke had charged Pitt with being 'one of the Prince's competitors' and charges of treason had been exchanged between Pitt and Fox.

The Competitors,12 Dec 1788. Pitt and the Prince of Wales "compete" for the crown - a satire on the debate of 10 Dec, when Burke had charged Pitt with being 'one of the Prince's competitors' and charges of treason had been exchanged between Pitt and Fox.

A nest of Billy biters : lately discovered in an ancient chapel in the West Minster. 1804

A nest of Billy biters : lately discovered in an ancient chapel in the West Minster. 1804

A hand-coloured print of the political situation immediately following the Act of Union that united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland. The two Kingdoms are represented by two bulls interlocking horns. The bull on the left is ridden by William Pitt who as dressed as St George, faces St Patrick on the right. Pitt attempts to allay St Patrick's concerns.  Inscribed in the plate: Publish'd Jany 1801 by R Ackermann No 101 Strand

A hand-coloured print of the political situation immediately following the Act of Union that united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland. The two Kingdoms are represented by two bulls interlocking horns. The bull on the left is ridden by William Pitt who as dressed as St George, faces St Patrick on the right. Pitt attempts to allay St Patrick's concerns. Inscribed in the plate: Publish'd Jany 1801 by R Ackermann No 101 Strand

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